Home Health News West Nile virus now detected in La Verne and Pomona – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

West Nile virus now detected in La Verne and Pomona – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

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West Nile virus activity was detected in a sample of mosquitoes in La Verne and Pomona, the San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District announced Thursday.

The announcement comes 10 days after the announcement of a similar finding in Baldwin Park and Orange.

The vector control district tests female mosquitoes and birds throughout the year for the presence of the virus and other mosquito-borne diseases.

The West Nile virus is the most common mosquito-borne disease that affects Los Angeles County, according to the vector control district website.

Two people were reported to have contracted the virus in late July and are expected to recover, Los Angeles County Public Health officials announced Aug. 5.

Those who contract the virus may experience symptoms such as fever, nausea, mild rashes and body aches. Some may experience more severe neurological symptoms as a result of inflammation in the brain and spinal cord, leading to paralysis, coma or death, according to the vector control district website.

People older than 50 and those with existing health conditions are most at risk for long-term health problems from the virus, according to health officials.

Not every mosquito bite results in contracting the virus, but warmer weather increases the risk of getting sick, vector control district spokesperson Levy Sun said in a statement.

“It’s easy to forget that a small mosquito can send you to the hospital and impact your life,” Sun said in a news release. “Every individual is responsible for preventing mosquitoes from growing in their yard or patio.”

Four out of five people will not show symptoms. There is no cure or vaccine for people, but there is a vaccine available for horses.

The San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District offers these suggestions to prevent spreading the virus:

  • Tip and toss stagnant water around the home
  • Make sure all window and doors screens are in good repair on your property
  • Wear insect repellent containing CDC-recommended Picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or IR3535. These are effective against mosquitoes when used as labeled
  • Contact San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District to report neglected swimming pools at www.SGVMosquito.org or 626-814-9466

Vector control specialists also monitor stagnant water sources where infected mosquitoes can be found.

“Hundreds of stagnant water sources ranging from plant saucers to swimming pools can be found in a community,” Jason Farned, vector control district Operations Manager, said in a statement. “We need residents and business owners to take responsibility of mosquito issues around their properties.”

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